Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Undergraduate Courses

These are the official descriptions of undergraduate English courses, as they appear in the Undergraduate Bulletin

For upper-division courses (those numbered above 100), instructors write more specific descriptions each time a course is offered. For those descriptions of specific sections, see Course Descriptions by Semester.

Writing Program Courses

The English Department's Writing Program is a three-semester course of studies meant to improve reading and writing skills by engaging students in serious study of interdisciplinary issues. The program is meant to advance the student from the level of writing short essays of description and narration, through proficiency in reading/writing expository prose using various rhetorical modes and aims, to the reading and writing skills required to research, develop and document a paper responding to a significant question or problem.  Student placement is determined by the student's performance on the English Placement Exam or acceptance of appropriate transfer credit.

English 13 English Composition

The first semester concentrates on improving the student's ability to read, analyze and respond in journal writing and more formal essays to thematic issues in humanities, social science and/or natural science.  

English 14 English Composition

The second semester concentrates on challenging and improving the student's ability to read, analyze and respond in more sophisticated ways to issues in humanities, social science and/or natural science. Prerequisite: English 13 or placement.  

English 16 English Composition  

The third semester expands the level and modes of inquiry to include more complex topics. Points of logic, substance and responsibility to the reader are emphasized. Prerequisite: English 14 or placement.  

English 13x, 14x, and 16x 

English 13x, 14x, and 16x are courses parallel to English 13, 14, and 16, for non-native speakers who need additional work in English as a second language.

Core Surveys of Literature in English

Any two courses from English 61 through 64 satisfy the Humanities Area I requirement of the core curriculum.

English 61 European Literatures I:  (Beginnings to the Eighteenth Century)

Prerequisite: English 16 An examination of significant works of the Western tradition from Ancient Greece and Rome and Medieval and Renaissance Italy, France, Germany and England. Close intensive readings from a wide representation of texts--epics, sacred books, poems, plays and tales arranged chronologically or thematically. All texts read in English.

English 62 European Literatures II:  (From the Eighteenth Century to the Present)

Prerequisite: English 16 An examination of important works of literature from both Western and Eastern Europe. Close, intensive reading from a wide representation of texts: novels, poems, plays and essays arranged chronologically or thematically. All texts read in English.

English 63 American Literatures

Prerequisite: English 16 The focus of each section concentrates on the literatures and traditions of the United States from Colonial times to the present or on a comparison and contrast of literatures across all the Americas North America, the Caribbean, Latin America. Arranged chronologically or thematically. All texts read in English.

English 64 Non-Western Literatures

Prerequisite: English 16 Drawing primarily from among the many literatures of Africa and Asia, each section focuses on at least two geographical areas, such as Western Africa, China, India, Japan, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands. Broad sweeps of time may be covered or specific periods of high cultural achievements such as the Tang Dynasty, Medieval Japan or West Africa before the European invasion. All texts read in English.

Major Level Courses

English 101 Introduction to English Studies

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Required of all English majors (who should take this course in the first or second semester of upper-division work in English), this course maps out the field of English Studies and provides a foundation for more advanced study in literature, creative writing, and rhetoric. Students develop skills in close reading, argumentation, prosody, and research. The course addresses issues in critical theory and introduces students to literary and rhetorical traditions.

English 102 History of Literary Theory

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Readings survey the history of literary theory from Plato to the present. A wide variety of critical approaches are discussed, including classicism, neoclassicism, romanticism, Marxism, the new criticism, structuralism, psychoanalytic criticism, feminism, gay studies, post-structuralism, ethnic studies, the new historicism and cultural studies. Subjects differ from semester to semester. May be taken twice for credit.

English 103 Workshop in the Essay (Same as Journalism 150)

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A nonfiction writing workshop in the genre of the essay. Content open to subjects across the disciplines, with particular emphasis on the essay as a literary form. Development of writing techniques through analysis of professional and student work. Weekly class sessions and frequent conferences on student work.

English 104 Creative Writing

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 An introductory creative-writing workshop. Students begin to learn and experiment with the art of writing in various genres, such as poetry, fiction, and playwriting. Although readings are included, emphasis is on class discussion of student manuscripts and individual conferences with the instructor.

English 119 Masterpieces of World Literature

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Readings in and discussions of masterpieces of world literature ranging from European and American texts to the literatures of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. The course includes texts such as The Iliad, "The Dream of the Red Chamber", and Sundiata. Authors studied range from Sophocles and Dante to Moliere, Goethe, and Morrison.

English 126 News Writing (Same as Journalism 119)

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 (Note: If you register for JOU 119, the only prerequisite is ENG 16.) Introduction to the writing of news stories studied for their organization, form, style and effectiveness as expression and communication. In newsroom laboratory sessions, students apply professional standards to their frequent assignments.

English 128 Early British Literatures

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 An exploration of significant texts and topics in British literature from a period of at least 200 years prior to 1800, including texts by Chaucer and Shakespeare. Themes vary from semester to semester and may include topics such as the Monstrous and the Fantastic, Sexuality and Gender in Medieval & the Renaissance, or Heroic Identities before 1700.

English 129 Later British Literatures

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 An exploration of significant texts and topics in British literature between 1800 and the present. Themes vary from semester to semester and may include topics such as the Age of Revolution, Writing Empire, or (Re)Writing Religion in Modern British Literature.

English 137 Shakespeare

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 The greatness of Shakespeare explored through the intensive study of selected plays and poems.

English 140 Major Authors

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A concentrated study of one or two authors or a writer and a major school American or British. Topics may include Chaucer, Jonson, Donne, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Austen, Woolf and the Bloomsbury Circle, Faulkner, Hemingway, Wright and the Chicago School, Morrison. Subjects differ from semester to semester. May be taken twice for credit.

English 150 Studies in Ethnic Literature

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 An intensive examination of particular traditions in literature. Topics may include African-American literature, Asian-American literature, Jewish literature, Russian literature, Latino/a literature. Subjects differ from semester to semester. May be taken twice for credit.

English 158 Early Literatures of the United States

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 An introduction to texts and themes in pre-Civil War American literature. Themes vary from semester to semester. Areas of exploration may include: Examining the Frontier, Slavery and Freedom, American Myths and U.S. Realities.

English 159 Literatures of the United States Since 1865

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 In this course, texts and themes are drawn from American literature from the Civil War to the present. Themes vary from semester to semester. Possible topics include: Country and City, Representing the Nation, Literature of a Multicultural United States.

English 160 Gender and Language

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 An examination of the relationship of gender and sexuality to studies of reading, writing, language use and language acquisition. Topics may include gender and reading, lesbian and gay voices, language and gender, queer theory, images of women in literature, contemporary masculinities, writing about lesbian and gay issues. Subjects differ from semester to semester. May be taken twice for credit.

English 163 Explorations in Non-Fiction Writing (same as Journalism 150)

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64. A nonfiction workshop in which students explore topics that include the essay, experimental nonfiction, zine writing, and digital storytelling. Emphasis on discussion of student manuscripts and individual conferences with instructor. May be taken twice for credit. Writing & Rhetoric may take this class twice for credit.

English 164 Explorations in Creative Writing

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64. A creative writing workshop in which students explore topics in writing including spoken word poetry, experimental fiction, poet's theater, short short story writing, and dramatic storytelling. Emphasis on discussion of student manuscripts and presentations and individual conferences with instructor. English majors concentrating in Creative Writing may take this class twice for credit.

English 165 Poetry Workshop

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and English 104 (Creative Writing) An intensive workshop devoted to writing poetry. Students will also be required to read selected poetry from published poets. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms and approaches. English majors concentrating in Creative Writing may take this class twice for credit.

English 166 Fiction Workshop

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and English 104 (Creative Writing) An intensive workshop devoted to writing fiction. Students will also be required to read selected fiction from published writers. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms and approaches. English majors concentrating in Creative Writing may take this class twice for credit.

English 167 Playwriting Workshop

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and English 104 (Creative Writing) An intensive workshop devoted to writing plays. Students will also be required to read selected plays from published playwrights. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms and approaches. English majors concentrating in Creative Writing may take this class twice for credit.

English 168 Creative Non-Fiction Workshop

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and English 103 (Workshop in the Essay) An intensive workshop devoted to writing literary essays. Students will also be required to read selected essays from published authors. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms and approaches. English majors concentrating in Creative Writing may take this class twice for credit. English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric orCreative Writing may take this class twice for credit.

English 169 Non-Western or Post-Colonial Literature

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 This course focuses on works, in English and in translation, emerging from non-Western cultures, including the cultures of Africa, Asia, and South America. Courses in this category must span a geographical region and a period of time adequate to address the historical context of the literature. Themes vary from semester to semester and may include topics such as: Voices of the African Diaspora, Buddhism in Asian Literatures, or Post-Colonial Literature and the Atlantic World.

English 170 Literary Periods and Movements

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A concentrated study of a particular period or movement in literary history. The focus may be on a specific national literature (American or British) or on the theoretical underpinnings of these movements. Topics may include colonial encounters, romanticism, the Victorians, realism and naturalism, modernism, postmodernism. Subjects differ from semester to semester. May be taken twice for credit.

English 171 Introduction to Classical Rhetoric

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Readings survey key figures and texts of the rhetorical traditions (ancient through Enlightenment). Course work emphasizes mastery of the material central to the development of the field of rhetoric.

English 172 Introduction to Contemporary Rhetorical Theory

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Readings survey key figures and texts in contemporary rhetorical theory (Nineteenth Century to the present). Course work emphasizes mastery of key rhetorical and theoretical concepts and focuses on how these theories have been influenced by earlier developments and how they have influenced current trends.

English 173 Writing in the Community

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A writing workshop in which students study the rhetoric and writing of community-based and other advocacy organizations. Topics vary from semester to semester and may include rhetorical analysis of community-based texts and strategies for the production of a range of writing, such as oral histories, grant proposals and pamphlets. English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric may take this class twice for credit.

English 174 Teaching Writing

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A seminar in which students survey the history, theories and practices of teaching writing at the high school and college levels. Topics vary from semester to semester and may include the history of writing instruction, composition theories and pedagogies, literacy theories and research, one-to-one conferencing, developing and designing curricula and assignments and responding to student writing. English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric may take this class twice for credit.

English 175 Writing for the Professions

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A writing workshop in which students study rhetorical strategies for professional and technical writing. Topics vary from semester to semester and may include writing grant proposals, reports, news releases, editorials, brochures, technical manuals, and a range of public documents. English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric may take this class twice for credit.

English 180 Genre Studies

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A study of a particular genre, offering examples from a wide range of literary history. Topics may include autobiography, great essays, the history of the novel, the making of modern poetry. Subjects differ from semester to semester. May be taken twice for credit.

English 184 Modern Drama

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A study of selected nineteenth- and twentieth-century playwrights, focusing on their investigation of contemporary issues and problems.

English 187 The Bible as Literature

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 The study of the Bible (in the King James version) as a work of literature, both for its expressiveness in language and images and its relation to the standard literary forms lyric poetry, drama or debate, narrative, etc. Those features of the Bible that are universal or archetypal in terms of its symbols or imaginative content. The ideas or world-view implied in the Bible and their comparisons or contrasts with those of other civilizations.

English 190 Senior Seminar in Literature
Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and Permission of English Department Chair. English majors concentrating in Literature pursue independent research projects in the history of literary studies or critical analysis. Each student develops a substantial research paper and presents it to the seminar.

English 191 Senior Seminar in Creative Writing
Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and Permission of English Department Chair. In this capstone course, English majors concentrating in Creative Writing pursue independent writing projects, resulting in a portfolio of poems, fiction, plays, or essays.

English 192 Senior Seminar in Writing & Rhetoric
Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and Permission of English Department Chair. In this capstone course, English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric apply the rhetorical knowledge and skills they have mastered in their other courses. Each student produces a substantial research paper analyzing a field-related issue or problem through the lens of his or her academic work in writing and rhetoric. May include a relevant internship.

English 195, 196 Honors Study

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Honors Study is designed to give outstanding students an opportunity to do independent work in their major under the guidance of a member of the faculty. To be eligible, students must have upper-junior or senior status, a cumulative quality-point ratio of 3.00, a 3.25 ratio in their major subject, Permission of English Department Chair and Permission of the Dean. A total of six credits of Honors Study is the maximum allowed. Three credits per semester.

English 197, 198 Independent Study

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64, Permission of English Department Chair and Permission of the Dean.

Independent Study & Tutorial--a simplified guide (this document is for use by full-time faculty who are trying to set up an independent study or tutorial with a student) Independent studies in areas of specialized interest are available. Three credits per semester.

English 200 Series

Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Courses in this series emphasize nontraditional subject matter and approaches to literature and vary from semester to semester. Previous topics have included: Asian/Asian-American Writers, Latin American Women Writers, Science Fiction, Representations of Women in Literature, Constructions of Masculinity in Black Literature, Africa in the British Imagination and Hispanic-American Fiction.




No comments: