Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Graduate Courses



These are the official descriptions of graduate English courses, as they appear in the LIU Brooklyn Graduate Bulletin.
Instructors write more specific descriptions each time a course is offered. For those descriptions of specific sections, see Course Descriptions by Semester.

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English 502 Writers on Writing Students will attend a weekly series of readings, lectures, and discussions by visiting writers. With a faculty member, students will read and analyze the works of a range of prominent and emerging writers and then interact with the writers themselves in the classroom. Offered every third semester. Required of students in the Creative Writing M.F.A. program. English 503 Theory of Writing This seminar concentrates on the major twentieth century theorists of poetry and fiction, many of whom were great creative writers themselves. The course makes the connection between literary theory and the work of the creative writer. Amongh the works under discussion are the theoretical works of Maurice Blanchot, Walter Benjamin, Julia Kristeva, Lyn Hejinian, Charles Olson, E. M. Forster, M. M. Bakhtin, Wayne Booth, and Gertrude Stein. The emphasis will be on a close reading of these texts in order to understand the place of theory in students' own creative writing. Offered every third semester. Required of students in the Creative Writing M.F.A. program. English 504 Traditions and Lineages This seminar concentrates on the major literary movements of the twentieth century, including Imagism, Objectivism, The Harlem Renaissance, Surrealism, The Beat Generation, and The New York School. Among the writers under discussion are Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, Laura Riding, Lorine Neidecker, Langston Hughes, Andre Breton, Allen Ginsberg, and Frank O'Hara. The emphasis will be on a close reading of these writers in order to understand the traditions behind our own work. English 508 General Linguistics (same as Anthropology 508) An introduction to the basic disciplines of linguistics: phonology, history of the English language, semantics and syntax, including traditional and generative-tranformational grammar. English 509 Sociolinguistics and the Teaching of Writing An introduction to the major theories and fieldwork in sociolinguistics. Students examine the connections between language and social class, ethnicity and gender and the implications of those connections for the teaching of writing. There is also a strong focus on the analysis of second language and second dialect writing, along with an exploration of multiple literacies. English 510 Technical Writing This course introduces students to the theory and practice of producing and managing documents that are used in industry and other organizational settings. Assignments include analytical writing, editing, designing, and testing of texts. Attention will be given to style manuals, users’ manuals, research-writing, and publication (as needed). English 511 Health and Science Writing This course guides students in analyzing genres and discourses that communicate health and science information; then researching, writing, and designing their own documents; and finally reviewing and testing their documents with their peers and non-specialist readers. The course is open both to health and science specialists and to writing specialists with little health or science background. English 512 Grant Writing This course guides students through the process of developing a complete grant proposal. Though oriented primarily to grant proposals for social and cultural agencies, educational organizations, and other nonprofits, the course explores rhetorical principles and strategies that can also be applied to research proposals and business proposals. English 519 Editing This course prepares students in the research, principles, and practices of editing essential to the process of publishing. Students gain knowledge of the principles underpinning different levels of professional editing and develop their own expertise through extensive practice. English 520 Nonfiction Writing Workshop An intensive workshop devoted to writing literary nonfiction. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms. Students in the Creative Writing track or Professional Writing track may take this class three times. English 522 Academic Writing Workshop An intensive advanced writing workshop for graduate students across the disciplines who wish to polish their academic writing skills. Students write critical essays in response to professional readings. English 523 Fiction Writing Workshop Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor An intensive workshop devoted to writing works of fiction. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms. Students in the Creative Writing track may take this class three times. English 524 Poetry Writing Workshop Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor An intensive workshop devoted to writing works of poetry. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms. Students in the Creative Writing track may take this class three times. English 525 Play Writing Workshop Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor An intensive workshop devoted to writing plays. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms. Students in the Creative Writing track may take this class three times. English 526 Writing for Media I: The Story (same as Media Arts 600) An introduction to the principles of screenwriting. Students explore dramatic structure, character development, dialogue, and plot through analysis of television and film narratives. They complete a story treatment and short screenplay or teleplay as their final project. English 527 Professional Writing Workshop An introduction to the theory, research, and practice of professional writing. Topics may include writing in such professions as medicine and law, writing for non-profit and cultural institutions, writing in digital media, scientific and technical writing, business writing, and grant writing. Students will both analyze and write professional writing documents and receive detailed feedback on their writing in intensive workshops. Students in the Professional Writing track may take this class three times. English 528 Seminar in Creative Writing An intensive workshop devoted to different strategies for writing imaginative texts, especially those that cross genres. Examples of special topics are: Collage: Image and Text, Science Fiction Writing, and The Prose Poem. Students in the Creative Writing track may take this class three times. English 529 Topics in Creative Writing (one credit) This workshop will be taught by a visiting writer. Students in the Creative Writing track may take this class six times. English 530 Topics in Writing A seminar on historical, theoretical, and practical aspects of writing. Topics may include community-based writing, writing for non-profits, social networking, and representations of writing in popular culture. English 531 Topics in Rhetoric An intensive study of rhetoric. Topics may include the history of rhetoric, non-western rhetorics, feminist rhetoric, uses of propaganda, and the rhetoric of war. English 532 Topics in Theory A seminar on theory. Topics may include discourse theory, critical theory, semiotics, and genre theory. English 533 Topics in Composition A study of theories and issues that inform the discipline commonly known as Rhetoric and Composition. Topics may include theories of composing, theories of reading, narrative theory, writing across the curriculum, and writing program administration. English 546 Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature Against the backdrop of sex, scandal, war, and revolution, the eighteenth century is fundamentally a time of change. This course studies the shift in popular literary forms from drama to poetry to the newly emerging novel. Students examine cultural themes of nationalism, empire, and revolution over roughly 120 years. Authors include Aphra Behn, John Dryden, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, Olaudah Equiano, and Fanny Burney. English 571 The Eighteenth Century English Novel This course will trace the rise of the English novel and the authors who helped shape its form. Authors include Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Fanny Burney, Henry Fielding, and Jane Austen. English 573 The Nineteenth Century English Novel Topics include the Gothic novel, women novelists, the novel of empire. Authors might include Dickens, the Bront√ęs, Eliot, Hardy, Thackeray. English 574 The Twentieth Century English Novel Studying the short and long fiction of male and female novelists, such as Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, E.M. Forster, D.H. Lawrence, Iris Murdoch, Ian McEwan, et al., this course will span the entire twentieth century and investigate topics like politics, gender relations, empire, or the development of modernist and postmodernist aesthetics. English 579 Seminar in Special Studies An intensive study of special areas of interest in literature. Examples of special topics are the works of a major author, English Renaissance and the arts, and detective fiction. English 580 Seminar in Twentieth Century Literature This course will trace some of the salient developments in Twentieth-Century World Literature. Possible topics include a study of genres such as fantasy, dystopia, or novels of ideas across different cultures, the emergence of postcolonial, minority, and diaspora literatures, the consolidation of women's literature, or the phenomenon of international modernism and postmodernism. English 620 Theories of Rhetoric and Teaching Writing An introduction to theories of teaching writing. Examines contemporary theories of rhetoric and composition, such as reader response, expressionist, cognitive, and social constructivist. English 624 Seminar in American Literature An intensive study of special areas of interest. Examples of special topics are romancing the frontier, the body in American literature, and melancholia and American literature. English 625 Nineteenth Century American Literature A study of the making of an American literature with diverse voices. Narratives, poetry, journals, essays, autobiographies, and folktalkes are considered. Authors include Poe, Hawthorne, James, Melville, Emerson, Whitman, Douglass, Twain, Crane, Dickinson, Chesnutt, Wharton, and Dreiser. English 626 Twentieth Century American Literature A review of the flowering of American letters between the two world wars. Modernism, new regionalism, expatriatism, the Harlem Renaissance, and gendered perspectives are among topics covered. Authors include Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Stein, Hurston, Frost, Hughes, Steinbeck, Eliot, Cather, West, and Stevens. English 631 Seminar in English and American Poetry Modernism, new regionalism, expatriatism, the Harlem Renaissance, and gender perspectives are among topics covered. Authors inlcude Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Stein, Hurston, Hughes, Steinbeck, Eliot, Cather, and Stevens. English 634 Twentieth Century Drama A study of selected masters of modern theater from Ibsen to Beckett. English 636 Seminar in Literary Periods and Movements An intensive study of special areas of interest. Examples of special topics are modernism, post-modernism, post-colonial literature, comparative literature. English 640 Second Language Writing This course aims to prepare graduate students to teach non-native speakers of English. Students will become knowledgeable in English syntax, rhetorical traditions of native and target languages, discipline-specific writing conventions, and issues involved in socialization. English 641 Literacy and Basic Writing An examination of the theoretical and practical questions surrounding the development of literacy, particularly in relation to basic writing instruction and multicultural contexts. English 642 Computers and Composition A study of the theories, research, and practices of new kinds of digital compositions and related social and pedagogical issues. Examines the impact of digital technology on writing and engages students in regular practice of multimodal forms composing. English 643 Seminar in Shakespeare A review of the major scholarly and critical approaches to Shakespeare. English 646 Individual and Small Group Writing Instruction A study of various collaborative and conference techniques for the teaching of writing. Designed to include theories of collaborative learning, practical applications in the classroom, and ethnographic or case study. English 649 Seminar in British Literature An intensive study of special areas of interest. Examples of special topics are Africa in British eyes and British women novelists. English 650 Seminar in Medieval Literature The course focuses on a particular text, topic, or tradition. Topics include Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, the Arthurian tradition, gender and sexuality in Medieval literature, and women of the Middle Ages. English 651 Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century English Literature With the transformations and tensions inherent in Christianity shaping the cultural climate of the time, the poetry and prose of the early modern period explore the contrast between the sacred and the profane. Authors include Philip Sidney, Christopher Marlowe, Aemilia Lanyer, John Donne, Lady Mary Wroth, Andrew Marvell, and Queen Elizabeth. English 654 Seminar in Milton Protestant Dissenter to Roman Catholic, radical to traditionalist, John Milton is a study in constrasts. This course will examine a representative body of Milton's essays and poetry in the context of his very turbulent times. Works examined include Comus, Lycidas, Of Reformation, and the greatest epic poem in English literature--Paradise Lost. English 655 Early Nineteenth Century English Literature A study of English Romantic poetry and prose non-fiction writers inlcuding Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Hemans, and Wollstonecraft. Topics might include the lyric poem, the development of national identity, the female author, the construction of the poet. English 656 Later Nineteenth Century English Literature A study of Victorian poets and non-fiction prose writers including Tennyson, Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Arnold, Swinburne, Hopkins, Dante and Christina Rosetti. Topics might include the epic poem, Victorians at home, race and empire, the medieval revival. English 670 Seminar in the Critical Tradition A study of the great literary critics, from Aristotle to T.S. Eliot. English 700 Practicum in the Teaching of Composition Prerequisite: English 641 A practicum designed to introduce new teachers to the theory and methods of writing pedagogy, with a central emphasis on classroom practice. English 705 Independent Study Prerequisite: Twelve graduate credits in English and permission of Department Chair. A tutorial seminar designed for advanced individual research or writing projects. Hours to be arranged. English 707 Methods of Research and Criticism A study of research techniques and critical approaches to literature. The writing of a literary critical essay is included. Required of students in all concentrations. Must be taken in the first Fall semester of graduate enrollment. English 708 Thesis (Pass/Fail Only) Click here to see the Graduate Thesis Manual.
With Concentration in Literature Prerequisite: At least 21 credits in graduate English courses completed with a 3.0 grade point average and permission of the thesis director, the graduate advisor, and the Department Chair. With Concentration in Creative Writing Prerequisite: At least 21 credits in graduate English courses (12 of them in writing) completed with a 3.0 grade point average and permission of the thesis director, the graduate advisor, and the Department Chair. With Concentration in Professional Writing Prerequisite: At least 21 credits in graduate English courses (12 of them in writing) completed with a 3.0 grade point average and permission of the thesis director, the graduate advisor, and the Department Chair.

With Concentration in the Teaching of Writing
Prerequisite: At least 21 credits in graduate English courses (12 of them in the teaching of writing) completed with a 3.0 grade point average and permission of the thesis director, the graduate advisor, and the Department Chair.

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