Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Undergraduate Courses--Summer & Fall 2011

English Majors: Please plan to register as early as possible. Otherwise, we may have to cancel courses for under-enrollment, and you’ll have to scramble to find replacement courses at the last minute. Every semester before you register—see Wayne Berninger.

Non-English Majors: Advanced English courses aren’t only for English majors! The writing and analytical skills that students gain in English classes are very useful in a variety of professional careers. Any student may take these courses as general electives. If you really want to build up your transcript, consider an English Minor (i.e., any four English courses numbered 100 or above). Note: The English minor will satisfy your Distribution Requirement, no matter what your major! If you’d like more information about minoring in English—or if you think you might like to major in English— see Wayne Berninger.

To schedule an appointment, go to wayneberninger.setster.com.

Summer 2011 (First Session: May 16 - June 27)

English 140 Major Authors (Course ID# 2771)
Topic: Toni Morrison
Professor Carol Allen
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:00 – 4:50 PM


For English majors, this course will satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. It can satisfy a literature requirement in either the Creative Writing concentration or the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. This course may be applied toward the English minor.

We will study a sampling of works by Toni Morrison, a tour de force on the international literary scene since the seventies. We will have the opportunity to address several of her novels along with an essay and speech in conjunction with critical texts about her work and an historical overview which situates her writing. Like August Wilson, her peer in the dramatic arts, Morrison has given us a wide-sweeping view of our world and nation from Slavery to Reconstruction, the Jazz Age, and the Civil Rights Era to the contemporary moment. So, an added benefit of such study will be a cross-century intense reading of America’s cultural, social, and economic landscape.

The course is designed to help you enhance your critical reading skills, perfect your research and writing, gain a sense of various styles and approaches to literary criticism, and become informed about the major social and cultural debates that have arisen in the last thirty years. Assignments include in-class writing, leading class discussion, and a short research paper.

Required texts may include Beloved, Jazz, Love, and Song of Solomon. Additional handouts will be comprised of Morrison’s essays, speech and critical articles.

Fall 2011

English 101 Introduction to English Studies (Course ID# 4630)
Professor Patricia Stephens
Mondays and Wednesdays, 1:30 – 2:45 PM


This course is required for English majors in all three concentrations (Literature, Creative Writing, Writing & Rhetoric). You must take it at some point within the first two semesters after completing the English core (i.e., ENG 16 and two courses from ENG 61-62-63-64). If you are at this stage and you don’t take ENG 101 in Fall 2011, then you must take it in Spring 2012. Yes, you may take other advanced ENG courses at the same time as ENG 101. This course may be applied toward the English minor.

This course is a reading and writing-intensive seminar that will focus on non-western twentieth century literature. Our work together during the semester will provide an intellectual framework and a range of analytical tools necessary for advanced studies in English, whether in literature, creative writing, or writing and rhetoric. The course has three over-arching goals: 1) to develop skills and increase proficiency in close readings of literary and critical texts; 2) to develop skills and increase proficiency in writing analytical essays about literature; and 3) to develop skills and increase proficiency in research and MLA documentation skills. Students will read several texts in common, as we learn close reading and analytical skills and will then select a text for further research from a list of texts provided by the instructor. Students will be required to take a mid-term exam and produce a research paper over the course of the semester.

English 126 News Writing Section 1 (Class ID# 5530)
Professor Donald Bird (Journalism)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:30 – 2:45 PM

English 126 News Writing Section 2 (Class ID# 6318)
Professor Donald Bird (Journalism)
Wednesdays, 6:00 – 8:30 PM


For English majors, this course will satisfy a writing-and-rhetoric elective requirement in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. For English majors concentrating in Creative Writing, this course will count only as a general elective. This course may be applied toward the English minor.

Please note that this course is cross-listed with Journalism (JOU) 119. Students who wish this course to count toward their English-major (or English-minor) requirements should be sure to register for one of the above sections of ENG 126 — not JOU 119.

Contact the Journalism Department for information about the content of this course.

English 128 Early British Literatures (Course ID# 6059)
Topic: Questions of Power in Early British Literatures
Professor Sealy Gilles
Tuesdays, 6:00 – 8:30 PM


For English majors, this course is required in the Literature concentration. It can satisfy a literature requirement in either the Creative Writing concentration or the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. This course may be applied toward the English minor.

Throughout the Middle Ages and the early modern period, the people of the British Isles experienced dramatic political and social changes—from the withdrawal of Roman forces shortly after 400 C.E. to the religious struggles of the seventeenth century. Waves of invasion, migration, and internal conflict are vividly reflected in the literature as poets and playwrights struggle with questions of power and legitimacy. How does one know who is entitled to rule? What right do the people have to resist unjust rule? What obligations does power bring? What are its costs? Does power corrupt? Can we celebrate it? How is power affected by gender? By ethnicity?

In answering these questions, we will explore literary representations of power in its many guises—brutal and humane, personal and political, controlled and excessive. Texts include Beowulf, Marie de France’s Lais, Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, and Shakespeare’s Richard III. In addition to the readings, students will receive detailed help with rough drafts, finished essays, and research writing.

English 158 Early Literatures of the United States (Course ID# 4356)
Topic: The American Renaissance
Professor Patrick Horrigan
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4:30 – 5:45 PM


For English majors, this course is required in the Literature concentration. It can satisfy a literature requirement in either the Creative Writing concentration or the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. This course may be applied toward the English minor.

Between the War of 1812 and the Civil War, the United States witnessed one of its greatest periods of artistic achievement, sometimes known as the “American Renaissance.” The course will examine representative works by the major writers of this period, including Washington Irving, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson, as well as some of the earlier colonial and revolutionary-era works that inspired them.

Readings will include fiction, poetry, philosophy, sermons, political manifestos, captivity and freedom narratives, and criticism. In addition to on-going class discussion, students will write a series of short essays in response to the readings and one longer critical essay or creative term project.

English 163 Explorations in Nonfiction Writing (Course ID# 6274)
Topic: Hybrid Discourse
Professor Donald McCrary
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:30 – 2:45 PM


For English majors, this course will satisfy a writing-and-rhetoric elective in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. I can satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. For English majors concentrating in Creative Writing, this course will count only as a general elective. This course may be applied toward the English minor. Any student (no matter what major or concentration)—including English minors—may take this class two times for credit.

From the video and audio mashups so popular in viral communities to the many print sources in which writers demonstrate their knowledge and facility with different languages and culture, hybrid discourse continues to gain popularity and agency in our society. The composition scholar Patricia Bizzell describes hybrid discourse as a “contact zone” where identity, culture, and voice intersect to create new expressive forms. Hybrid discourse is particularly suitable for expressing multilingual knowledge and skill, for expressing the multiple self. In this course, we will explore hybrid discourse both inside and outside the academy. We will read academic writers such as Keith Gilyard, Victor Villanueva, and Gloria Andalzua. We will read non-academic hybrid discourse found in magazines, novels, and the internet, analyzing how hybrid discourse is constructed and what it tells us about texts and ourselves. In addition to reading hybrid discourse, each student will present a course reading to the class, complete journal entries, and write an academic or non-academic hybrid text, both of which can include different types of media—print, digital, and visual.

English 164 Explorations in Creative Writing (Course ID# 5636)
Professor Lewis Warsh
Thursdays, 6:00 – 8:30 PM


For English majors, this course is required in the Creative Writing concentration. It can satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. For English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric, this course will count only as a general elective. This course may be applied toward the English minor. Any student (no matter what major or concentration)—including English minors—may take this class two times for credit.

The goal of the workshop is to expand our iddeas of “what is a poem” and “what is a work of fiction.” Are poetry and fiction exclusive or related genres? Weekly assignments will question preconceived notions of form, content and gender, with emphasis on the best ways of transcribing thought processes and experiences into writing. We will also attempt to engage the present moment--the issues of our time, if any, that infuence our writing. Is it possible to write in a vacuum while ignoring the rest of the world? What is the writer's responsibility? Can writing change the world? We will read as models the work of William Carlos Williams, Amiri Baraka, Frank O'Hara, Andre Breton, Lydia Davis, Gertrude Stein, Ted Berrigan, Elizabeth Bishop, John Ashbery, Wang Ping, Junot Diaz, and Ernest Hemingway, among many others. Much of the workshop time will be spent reading and discussing each other's writing.

English 165 Poetry Workshop (Course ID# 4403)
Topic: A Poetics of Voice and Time
Professor John High
Mondays, 1:00 – 3:30 PM


Update: course was cancelled.

For English majors, this course will satisfy a creative-writing elective in the Creative Writing concentration. It can satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. For English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric, this course will count only as a general elective. This course may be applied toward the English minor. English majors concentrating in Creative Writing may take this class two times for credit.

What if as poets we were allowed to do whatever we wanted? What would we do? How long would our own experience & voice sustain us in writing? Every innovation in poetry has grown out of a tradition, and in this course we will attempt to discover and connect with our own tradition(s) and poetic freedom. Wallace Stevens wrote that all poetry is experimental. So what is the relationship between tradition, innovation, and a writer’s unique poetic, history, background and culture? If our own voices grow out of the past and from traditions firmly rooted in the power of language, our goal is to discover—to see what’s out there, both as writers and readers—as we examine the literary traditions and lineages from which we have grown. We’ll do this by writing our own poems and by exploring various forms and schools of poetry and by paying close attention to the way that poetry changes through us and through time. We’ll also discuss the act of writing poetry as one of risk-taking and investigation, of destroying and reinventing traditions in our own tongue, of seeing how nothing ever changes until you bring yourself into the process of making/creating. We’ll discuss, at length, what “experiment” means in relation to “tradition” and “poetic.” Among the poets we’ll look at closely are Whitman, H.D., Williams, Pound, Stein, Bishop, Hughes, Cullen, Cane, Spicer, Levertov, Brooks, Creeley, Baraka, Whalen, O’Hara, Zukofsky, Mayer, Howe, and Ginsberg.

English 169 Nonwestern or Postcolonial Literature (Course ID# 5638)
The Hispanophone Caribbean
Professor Maria McGarrity
Wednesdays, 1:00 – 3:30 PM


Update: course was cancelled.

For English majors, this course is required in the Literature concentration. It can satisfy a literature requirement in either the Creative Writing concentration or the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. This course may be applied toward the English minor.

This course will examine the issues of language, identity, and diaspora of the Spanish-speaking Caribbean. In The Repeating Island, the Cuban theorist, Antonio Benítez-Rojo, called this island chain a “meta-archipelago” because the sea and land borders that might seem initially to separate these isles in fact link them beyond the boundaries of the language-nation-island-state. We will explore the myth of the Virgen de la Caridad del Cobre which details the vision of this Christian saint amid a fierce storm by three people, two indigenous men and one African man, as a marker of an inclusive Caribbean cultural hybridity that rejects the easy formation of exclusive cultural and linguistic barriers. We will pay special attention to the writings of the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Cuba with a wide-ranging, fluid vision of Caribbean culture prevalent amid this dynamic chain of islands and in the larger diasporic world. We will read such writers as José Lezama Lima, Alejo Carpentier, Julia Alavarez, Christina Garcia, and Rosario Ferré as we investigate the structures and struggles of individual and collective identity.

English 172 Introduction to Contemporary Rhetorical Theory (Course ID# 6049)
Professor John Killoran
Mondays & Wednesdays 4:30 - 5:45 pm


For English majors, this course is required in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can also satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. For English majors concentrating in Creative Writing, this course will count only as a general elective. This course may be applied toward the English minor.

• How does a political candidate’s speech rouse voters?
• How does a lawyer’s argument sway jurors?
• How does an organization’s advertisement influence consumers?
• How do a song’s lyrics move listeners?

In Contemporary Rhetorical Theory, we aim to answer these and similar questions about the nature and power of language. The course is an elective for students across the disciplines as well as in English who seek to understand the persuasive effect of language in their personal lives, their communities, and their careers.

Students will learn perspectives to help them recognize how language persuades us of what we believe and whom we believe. By the end of the semester, students will have developed their sensitivity to the power in others’ use of language and will become more empowered in their own use of language.

For more information, contact Professor Killoran at John.Killoran@liu.edu.

English 180 Genre Studies (Course ID# 6275)
Topic: Graphic Literature
Professor Patrick Horrigan
Thursdays, 6:00 – 8:30 PM


For English majors, this course will satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. It can also satisfy a literature requirement in either the Creative Writing concentration or the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. This course may be applied toward the English minor.

Some of the most entertaining and powerful stories today are being told through the medium of comics—the artful blending of words and pictures on the page. Comic books aren’t just for kids anymore. In fact, books of “graphic literature,” as they are sometimes called, include everything from the adventures of Batman to the memoirs of Holocaust survivors. They might be funny or terrifying, action-packed or deeply psychological, explosively colorful or cool black and white. They might take place in the past, present, or future, on planet Earth or someplace you’ve never heard of before.

This course will sample the rich body of graphic literature since the mid-twentieth-century with an emphasis on work from the last two decades. Our goal will be to experience the pleasures and challenges of a medium that combines text and image. We’ll get a sense of the literature’s characteristic themes and ways of seeing the world, and we’ll develop an understanding of what makes the medium of comics distinct from other verbal and visual media, including film.

Books for discussion may include Herge, The Adventures of Tintin: King Ottokar’s Sceptre; Frank Miller, Batman: The Dark Knight Returns; Art Spiegelman, Maus; Chris Ware, Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth; Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis; Alison Bechdel, Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic; Gene Luen Yang, American Born Chinese; R. Sikoryak, Masterpiece Comics; and Scott McCloud, Understanding Comics.

Throughout the semester, students will write a series of short essays as well as a longer piece that may take the form of a research paper or a creative project.
________________________________________

ALSO… FOR ENGLISH MAJORS (& MINORS) IN THE HONORS PROGRAM —

Any of the following Honors electives (taught by English Department faculty) will satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration, or a literature requirement in the Creative Writing concentration, or a literature requirement in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. These courses may be applied toward the English minor. Honors courses are open only to students in the Honors Program.

HHE 169 Edgar Allan Poe: His Life, Work, and Cultural Legacy (Course ID# 6345)
Professor Louis Parascandola
Mondays, 6:00 – 8:30 PM

HHE 170 War and Peace (Course ID# 6346)
Professor John High
Tuesdays, 3:00 – 5:30 PM

HHE 171 Rubbish! (Course ID# 6347)
Professor Leah Dilworth
Wednesdays, 6:00 – 8:30 PM

________________________________________

STUDY ABROAD AND EARN CREDIT THAT CAN BE APPLIED TOWARD YOUR ENGLISH MAJOR

The Global College Program of Long Island University invites English majors to study abroad for a semester or a year at one of our centers—Costa Rica, Japan, China, or India. Not only will you have the opportunity to study and travel in a foreign country while earning credit towards your major, but you will also become immersed in another culture, develop your global awareness and cross-cultural communication skills, and be provided with a variety of internship and service learning opportunities. At all centers, students are encouraged to engage in independent-study projects relevant to their academic interests.

The Costa Rica Program in Heredia offers home stays with Costa Rican families, internships throughout the region, and courses in writing, Latin American studies, cross-cultural research methods, Latin American literature, Spanish language, global health and traditional healing, peace and reconciliation studies, environmental studies, and an introduction to experiential education.

The India Program in Bangalore enables students to explore the country’s religious and cultural diversity, the caste system, travel writing, environmental issues, the situation of Tibetan refugees, and the status of women. Students also have the opportunity to study India’s art forms, dance, and music.

The China Program in Hangzhou allows students to study a wide range of topics including the history of China, religious life in China, traditional Chinese medicine, poetry, women’s issues, calligraphy, taiji, Mandarin Chinese language and modernization and economic development.

The Comparative Religion and Culture Program enables students to engage in intensive study of the teachings, rituals, and spiritual practices of the world’s major religions while exploring cross-cultural issues such as identity, human rights, peace and reconciliation, and world citizenship. During the fall semester, students travel in Taiwan and Thailand, and during the spring semester, students travel throughout India and Turkey while they immerse themselves in the religions and cultures of these countries. The courses offered in the fall include: Comparison: Theory and Method, Religions and Modernity in Taiwan, Culture and Society of Taiwan, and Religions and Modernity in Thailand. The following courses are offered in the spring: Comparison: Practice and Critique, Religions and Modernity in India, History and Society in India, and Religions and Modernity in Turkey.

The Australia Program in Byron Bay is offered only during the spring semester. Students explore the relationships between people and their environment from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students travel throughout Australia and take courses that focus on indigenous peoples, the natural history, ecological diversity and related social and cultural contexts of Australia through seminars, field trips, service learning and internships.

Long Island University Financial Aid can be applied to all Global College overseas programs. For more information call 718 488 3409 or e-mail globalcollege@liu.edu.

A number of $5000 scholarships may be available to study in Global College programs.

English Majors who are interested in Global College should see the next page for the English Department’s Guidelines for English Majors Studying Abroad in the Global College Program—please do not register for Global College without meeting with Wayne Berninger first! Contact Wayne Berninger (718-780-4328 or wayne.berninger@liu.edu). Note: You can also schedule your own appointment online at wayneberninger.setster.com.
________________________________________

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT GUIDELINES FOR ENGLISH MAJORS STUDYING ABROAD IN THE GLOBAL COLLEGE PROGRAM

The following are guidelines for undergraduate English majors who wish to study abroad through the Global College Program and apply the credits earned toward their upper-division English major requirements.


 Student must receive permission from Undergraduate Registration Advisor (Wayne Berninger) and Chair of English to enroll in Global College. See Wayne Berninger FIRST, before you do anything else.

 Before going abroad, student must have completed ENG 16, COS 50, and six credits from ENG 61-62-63-64.

 A maximum of 12 Global College credits may be applied toward upper-division English major requirements.

 During any semester abroad, student must take 6 credits (or equivalent) in English. Independent study may be arranged, in consultation with Undergraduate Advisor and Chair of English.

Notes

 Tuition, fees, and room & board abroad is about the same as tuition, fees, and room & board at the Brooklyn Campus.

 University financial aid and scholarships are transferable to Global College. However, students should be aware that there are no work-study opportunities abroad. Also, athletes who receive free room and board at the Brooklyn Campus are not automatically eligible for same while abroad. Department of Athletics may agree to provide athletes with a stipend to cover Global College room & board fees. Students are urged to discuss this possibility with the Department of Athletics before they decide to study abroad.

 Global College has additional sources of scholarships for students studying abroad.


No comments: