Thursday, October 7, 2010

Spring 2011 Courses, Undergraduate

English Majors — If you are an English major, you must meet with Wayne Berninger (the English Department’s Undergraduate Registration Advisor) as early as possible BEFORE you register. Please plan to register as early as possible so courses fill up. As you know, if the Dean cancels courses for under-enrollment, you’ll have to scramble to find replacement courses at the last minute. Consult the English Department website to determine which courses you still need for your particular concentration (i.e., Creative Writing, Literature, or Writing & Rhetoric), and then contact Wayne (phone 718-780-4328 or e-mail wayne.berninger@liu.edu). You can schedule your own appointment at wayneberninger.setster.com!

Non-English Majors — Advanced English courses aren’t only for English majors! The writing and analytical skills that students gain in English classes are very useful in a variety of professional careers. Even if you are not majoring in English, you can still take upper-division English courses—as long as you have completed the prerequisites (i.e., ENG 16 and two courses from ENG 61-62-63-64). If you really want to build up your transcript, consider an English Minor, which consists of any four English courses numbered 100 or above. Note: According to the Brooklyn Campus Undergraduate Bulletin, “Any minor satisfies the Distribution Requirement.” This is true no matter what division your major is in! If you’d like more information about minoring in English—or if you think you might like to major in English— contact Wayne Berninger in the English Department (phone 718-780-4328 or e-mail wayne.berninger@liu.edu). You can schedule your own appointment at wayneberninger.setster.com!

Advanced English Courses
Spring 2011


English 126 News Writing (Class ID# 2077) / cross-listed with Journalism 119 (Class ID# 1178)
Professor Donald Bird (Journalism Department)
Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:30-2:45 pm


For English majors, this course will satisfy a writing-and-rhetoric elective requirement in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can also satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. Students in either of the preceding categories who wish this course to count toward their English-major requirements should be sure to register for ENG 126—not JOU 119. For English majors concentrating in Creative Writing, this course will count as a general elective.

Contact the Journalism Department for information about this course.

English 129 Later British Literatures (Class ID# 1581)
The Artist Coming of Age: Creating the “Uncreated Conscience”
Professor Maria McGarrity
Tuesdays 6-8:30 pm


For English majors, this course is required in the Literature concentration. It can also satisfy a literature requirement in the Creative Writing concentration or in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration.

This course will examine the development of artistic consciousness in the British tradition. We will examine the role of the artist in society, his or her alienation from society, the unique perspectives of the artist and his or her role as critic, both literary and social. We will begin with the youthful artistic idealism of Keats, move onto a discussion of Wordsworth’s vision of the poet, Byron’s art in action, and expand our vision of the artist to include the feminine with Christina Rosetti and Virginia Woolf. We will transition into the Modern period with Wilde’s conception of criticism as art. Finally we will examine modernity and the aftermath of Joyce’s achievement through the twentieth century. We will challenge the idea that any writer can, as Joyce claimed to through his character Stephen Dedalus, “create the uncreated conscience of [his] race.” Required Texts: Greenblatt et al., eds, The Norton Anthology of English Literature, The Major Authors, 8th Edition, Volume B; Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as Young Man, Norton Critical edition.

English 159 Literatures of the U.S. Since 1865 (Class ID# 1170)
High and Low Culture
Professor Carol Allen
Mondays 6-8:30 pm


For English majors, this course is required in the Literature concentration. It can also satisfy a literature requirement in the Creative Writing concentration or in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration.

This course begins with the shift in American culture that occurred during the nineteenth century when high and low sectors began to be defined, calcified and defended, a transition that continues to impact on us today. We will chart how major American artists have responded to this dichotomy with their texts that range from novels, to drama, to poetry and essays. Following such a path will also lead us to concentrate heavily on class, public space, racial and ethnic difference, youth movements, and such ideas as margin versus center and cosmopolitanism versus regionalism. Be prepared for a variety of assignments that will include trips to cultural institutions, informal writing, presentations, in-class essays and a longer project. You will learn about the major movements in American literary development from the Civil War to present, hone your critical reading skills, perfect your writing, and command an informed opinion about the ongoing cultural “wars” that shape us today. Required texts might include Highbrow, Lowbrow, Lawrence Levine; The Country of the Pointed Firs, Sarah Orne Jewett; As I Lay Dying, William Faulkner; Sula, Toni Morrison; A Streetcar Named Desire, Tennessee Williams; The Intuitionist, Colson Whitehead; The Namesake, Jhumpa Lahiri.

English 163 Explorations in Nonfiction Writing (Class ID# 3009)
Travel Writing: The Self in Other People’s World
Professor Michael Bokor
Thursdays 6-8:30 pm


For English majors, this course will satisfy a writing-and-rhetoric elective in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can also satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. Any student (no matter what major or concentration) may take this class two times for credit.

This course explores travel writing as an instrument of self-discovery as well as orientation to physical space as a site for political, economic, ideological, and cultural exchanges. It teaches students the skills for writing and evaluating travelogues. Some of the critical issues that we will examine include:

• What are the psychological urges that prompt people to leave home for other places?
• What philosophical insights into the nature of life and culture can traveling yield and how are these experiences presented in writing to reflect the travelers’ worldviews?
• Is traveling a political, economic, social, cultural, and ideological act, and how do the travelers’ own perspectives influence the way they experience the places they visit and write about?

The course emphasizes hands-on writing, reading, and discussion activities. The major assignment for the course is an extended writing project (that will involve students’ own traveling experiences) and multi-media presentations (writing on the Web).

English 166 Fiction Writing Workshop (Class ID# 1249)
How to Get There
Professor Lewis Warsh
Tuesdays 3-5:30 pm


For English majors, this course will satisfy a creative-writing elective in the Creative Writing concentration. It can also satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. English majors concentrating in Creative Writing may take this class two times for credit.

This workshop will focus on the way autobiography overlaps with fiction and how the past is fictionalized as a way of keeping it alive. The premise is that the source of most fiction is fading memories, whether we're aware of it or not. Though Jack Kerouac is the most obvious exponent of this method, we'll look at other writers of the last century (Marguerite Duras, Thomas Bernhard, Lydia Davis, John Edgar Wideman, Georges Perec, Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, Laura Riding, Jamaica Kincaid, James Ellroy, Maurice Blanchot) who struggle to cross the borders between fiction and life story. We'll concentrate on the conventions of fiction--plot, character, conflict--with an eye towards expanding on what's already been done. Our writing projects will include working with secrets, memories, observations, opinions, over-heard conversations--fragments of everything.

English 175 Writing for the Professions (Class ID# 2074)
Professor John Killoran
Mondays & Wednesdays 4:30-5:45 pm


For English majors, this course will satisfy a writing-and-rhetoric elective in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can also satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric may take this class two times for credit.

This is a writing course for students in any field preparing for their careers.
When you are given your first writing project on the job, will you know what to do? Writing for the Professions is an elective for students across the disciplines as well as in English who are looking ahead to prepare themselves to write for their careers in business, law, the health professions, science, technology, education, and the arts.

Students will learn to orient their writing toward different audiences, such as managers, customers, clients, and professional colleagues. Students will also learn to write in ways that result in action. By the end of the semester, students will have written their resume and other career-related documents, and will be more confident in their abilities to write effectively.

English 180 Genre Studies (Class ID# 3008)
THE HORROR! THE HORROR!: 19th Century British Gothic Fiction and Film
Professor Louis Parascandola
Wednesdays 6-8:30 pm


This course will satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. It can also satisfy a literature requirement in the Creative Writing concentration or in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration.

Read some of the most chilling gothic (horror) stories ever written. Works to be studied include such classics as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Jane Austen’s satire Northanger Abbey, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights, and H.G. Wells’ The Island of Dr. Moreau. These works are not only great spine-tinglers; they also reflect and often question the prevailing divine, social, scientific, and political hierarchies. We will also view excerpts from some of the many films that were made of each of these works.

Click image to see flyer for English 180.



English 190: Senior Seminar in Literature (Class ID# 1034)
Professor Leah Dilworth
Wednesdays 3-5:30 pm


This course is required for English majors concentrating in Literature. If you register for this course, and it cancels due to low enrollment, consult one of the Co-chairs of the English Department (either Professor Leah Dilworth or Professor Sealy Gilles) or the Undergraduate Registration Advisor (Wayne Berninger). If you need it for May graduation, we can arrange for you to take it as a Tutorial. Otherwise, we may ask you to wait until the next time it’s offered.

This course will guide students through the process of writing a long research paper (20-25 pages) on a topic of their own choosing. Students will use a range of research resources and write an informal proposal, a formal proposal, a first draft, and a final draft of the paper. You will also read and critique each other’s work. Required reading will include essays on research methods and writing as well as a literary text and selected critical essays.

English 191: Senior Seminar in Creative Writing (Class ID# 1491)
Staff
Day/Time TBA


This course is required for English majors concentrating in Literature. If you register for this course, and it cancels due to low enrollment, consult one of the Co-chairs of the English Department (either Professor Leah Dilworth or Professor Sealy Gilles) or the Undergraduate Registration Advisor (Wayne Berninger). If you need it for May graduation, we can arrange for you to take it as a Tutorial. Otherwise, we may ask you to wait until the next time it’s offered.

English 192: Senior Seminar In Writing & Rhetoric (Class ID# 1177)
Staff
Day/Time TBA


This course is required for English majors concentrating in Literature. If you register for this course, and it cancels due to low enrollment, consult one of the Co-chairs of the English Department (either Professor Leah Dilworth or Professor Sealy Gilles) or the Undergraduate Registration Advisor (Wayne Berninger). If you need it for May graduation, we can arrange for you to take it as a Tutorial. Otherwise, we may ask you to wait until the next time it’s offered.



FOR ENGLISH MAJORS (AND MINORS) IN THE HONORS PROGRAM

Because it is being taught by a member of the English Department faculty, the following Honors elective will satisfy an English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. It can also be used to satisfy a literature requirement in the Creative Writing concentration or in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. Non-English majors can also apply this course toward a minor in English. Please discuss your situation with Wayne Berninger in the English Department before you register for this course. You may register for this course only if you are in the Honors Program.

HHE 162 Broadway: The American Musical (Class ID# 3063)
Professor Michael Bennett
Thursdays 6-8:30




STUDY ABROAD AND EARN CREDIT THAT CAN BE APPLIED TOWARD YOUR MAJOR

The Global College Program of Long Island University invites English majors to study abroad for a semester or a year at one of our centers—Costa Rica, Japan, China, or India. Not only will you have the opportunity to study and travel in a foreign country while earning credit towards your major, but you will also become immersed in another culture, develop your global awareness and cross-cultural communication skills, and be provided with a variety of internship and service learning opportunities. At all centers, students are encouraged to engage in independent-study projects relevant to their academic interests.

The Costa Rica Program in Heredia offers home stays with Costa Rican families, internships throughout the region, and courses in writing, Latin American studies, cross-cultural research methods, Latin American literature, Spanish language, global health and traditional healing, peace and reconciliation studies, environmental studies, and an introduction to experiential education.

The India Program in Bangalore enables students to explore the country’s religious and cultural diversity, the caste system, travel writing, environmental issues, the situation of Tibetan refugees, and the status of women. Students also have the opportunity to study India’s art forms, dance, and music.

The China Program in Hangzhou allows students to study a wide range of topics including the history of China, religious life in China, traditional Chinese medicine, poetry, women’s issues, calligraphy, taiji, Mandarin Chinese language and modernization and economic development.

The Comparative Religion and Culture Program enables students to engage in intensive study of the teachings, rituals, and spiritual practices of the world’s major religions while exploring cross-cultural issues such as identity, human rights, peace and reconciliation, and world citizenship. During the fall semester, students travel in Taiwan and Thailand, and during the spring semester, students travel throughout India and Turkey while they immerse themselves in the religions and cultures of these countries. The courses offered in the fall include: Comparison: Theory and Method, Religions and Modernity in Taiwan, Culture and Society of Taiwan, and Religions and Modernity in Thailand. The following courses are offered in the spring: Comparison: Practice and Critique, Religions and Modernity in India, History and Society in India, and Religions and Modernity in Turkey.

The Australia Program in Byron Bay is offered only during the spring semester. Students explore the relationships between people and their environment from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students travel throughout Australia and take courses that focus on indigenous peoples, the natural history, ecological diversity and related social and cultural contexts of Australia through seminars, field trips, service learning and internships.

Long Island University Financial Aid can be applied to all Global College overseas programs. For more information call 718 488 3409 or e-mail globalcollege@liu.edu.

A number of $5000 scholarships may be available to study in Global College programs.

English Majors who are interested in Global College should see the next page for the English Department’s Guidelines for English Majors Studying Abroad in the Global College Program—please do not register for Global College without meeting with Wayne Berninger first! Contact Wayne Berninger (718-780-4328 or wayne.berninger@liu.edu). Note: You can also schedule your own appointment online at wayneberninger.setster.com.



ENGLISH DEPARTMENT GUIDELINES FOR ENGLISH MAJORS STUDYING ABROAD IN THE GLOBAL COLLEGE PROGRAM

The following are guidelines for undergraduate English majors who wish to study abroad through the Global College Program and apply the credits earned toward their upper-division English major requirements.

*Student must receive permission from Undergraduate Registration Advisor (Wayne Berninger) and Chair of English to enroll in Global College. See Wayne Berninger FIRST, before you do anything else.

*Before going abroad, student must have completed ENG 16, COS 50, and six credits from ENG 61-62-63-64.

*A maximum of 12 Global College credits may be applied toward upper-division English major requirements.

*During any semester abroad, student must take 6 credits (or equivalent) in English. Independent study may be arranged, in consultation with Undergraduate Advisor and Chair of English.

Notes

*Tuition, fees, and room & board abroad is about the same as tuition, fees, and room & board at the Brooklyn Campus.

*University financial aid and scholarships are transferable to Global College. However, students should be aware that there are no work-study opportunities abroad. Also, athletes who receive free room and board at the Brooklyn Campus are not automatically eligible for same while abroad. Department of Athletics may agree to provide athletes with a stipend to cover Global College room & board fees. Students are urged to discuss this possibility with the Department of Athletics before they decide to study abroad.

*Global College has additional sources of scholarships for students studying abroad.

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