Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Lewis Warsh at Picasso Machinery

PICASSO MACHINERY presents:

*And The Wiremen (music)
*Laura Elrick (poems)
*Jerold H. Rarefaction (music)
*Molly Schwartz (film)
*Lewis Warsh (poems)




Friday, July 26, 2013, 8PM
at Picasso Machinery
45 Broadway/Wythe
Brooklyn, NY

*And The Wiremen is a Brooklyn-based ensemble led by songwriter Lynn Wright. It features Paul Watson (Sparklehorse) on trumpet, Tony Maimone (Pere Ubu)/Eric Eble on bass, and Jon Petrow on violin.

*Laura Elrick’s Propagation is recently out from Kenning Editions. Previous works include Blocks Away (2010), Stalk (2008), Fantasies in Permeable Structures (2005) and sKincerity (2003). She teaches at Pratt Institute.

*Focused on texture, timbre, and impact, Rarefaction's sonic minimalism occupies a realm of soundtrack-oriented depth and subtlety.

*Molly Schwartz makes interactive art installations, animated videos, and drawings—informal narratives traveling through aerial, arboreal and aquatic worlds. She also designs and animates for independent film.

*Lewis Warsh's most recent books are Inseparable: Poems 1995-2005 (Granary) and A Place in the Sun (Spuyten Duyvil). One Foot Out the Door: Collected Stories is forthcoming from Spuyten Duyvil in 2014. He publishes United Artists Books and teaches in the MFA program at Long Island University (Brooklyn).

Friday, July 19, 2013

Tell Me a Story: An Informal Reading and Potluck for Creative Writing MFA Students Past & Present & Faculty

Friday, July 26, 2013
5:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Spector Lounge, Fourth Floor, Humanities Building

No Cover, No drama. Read only if you want to.

Leave when you’re ready.

Support, donations, questions:
Call or text Desiree at 718-415-0603.

 

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Course Descriptions by Semester

These descriptions of advanced undergraduate courses (100 and above) and graduate courses were prepared by the professors teaching these particular sections. 

They are more detailed than the "official" course descriptions that appear in the Undergraduate or Graduate Bulletin. To find thosesee links in the sidebar.

Fall 2014 Undergraduate

Summer 2014 & Fall 2014 Graduate

Spring 2014 Undergraduate

Spring 2014 Graduate

Summer 2013 and Fall 2013 Undergraduate

Summer 2013 and Fall 2013 Graduate

Spring 2013 Undergraduate

Spring 2013 Graduate

Summer 2012 and Fall 2012 Undergraduate

Summer 2012 and Fall 2012 Graduate

Spring 2012 Undergraduate

Spring 2012 Graduate

Summer 2011 and Fall 2011 Undergraduate

Summer 2011 and Fall 2011 Graduate

Spring 2011 Undergraduate

Spring 2011 Graduate

Summer 2010 and Fall 2010 Undergraduate

Summer 2010 and Fall 2010 Graduate

Spring 2010 Undergraduate

Spring 2010 Graduate

Summer 2009 and Fall 2009 Undergraduate

Summer 2009 and Fall 2009 Graduate

Spring 2009 Undergraduate

Spring 2009 Graduate

Summer 2008 and Fall 2008 Undergraduate

Summer 2008 and Fall 2008 Graduate

Spring 2008 Undergraduate

Spring 2008 Graduate

Summer 2007 and Fall 2007 Undergraduate

Summer 2007 and Fall 2007 Graduate

Spring 2007 Undergraduate

Spring 2007 Graduate

Summer 2006 and Fall 2006 Undergraduate

Summer 2006 and Fall 2006 Graduate

Spring 2006 Undergraduate

Spring 2006 Graduate

Summer 2005 and Fall 2005 Undergraduate

Summer 2005 and Fall 2005 Graduate

Spring 2005 Undergraduate

Spring 2005 Graduate

Summer 2004 and Fall 2004 Undergraduate

Summer 2004 and Fall 2004 Graduate

Spring 2004 Undergraduate

Spring 2004 Graduate

Summer 2003 and Fall 2003 Undergraduate

Summer 2003 and Fall 2003 Graduate

Spring 2003 Undergraduate

Spring 2003 Graduate

Summer 2002 and Fall 2002 Undergraduate

Summer 2002 and Fall 2002 Graduate

Spring 2002 Undergraduate

Spring 2002 Graduate

Summer 2001 and Fall 2001 Undergraduate

Summer 2001 and Fall 2001 Graduate

Spring 2001 Undergraduate

Spring 2001 Graduate

Summer 2000 (none) and Fall 2000 Undergraduate

Summer 2000 and Fall 2000 Graduate

Spring 2000 Undergraduate

Spring 2000 Graduate

    Wednesday, July 17, 2013

    Graduate Courses


    These are the generic descriptions of graduate English courses, as they appear in the Bulletin. Instructors write more specific descriptions each time a course is offered. For those descriptions of specific sections, see Course Descriptions by Semester.

    BACK TO THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT WEBSITE

    English 502 Writers on Writing Students will attend a weekly series of readings, lectures, and discussions by visiting writers. With a faculty member, students will read and analyze the works of a range of prominent and emerging writers and then interact with the writers themselves in the classroom. Offered every third semester. Required of students in the Creative Writing M.F.A. program. English 503 Theory of Writing This seminar concentrates on the major twentieth century theorists of poetry and fiction, many of whom were great creative writers themselves. The course makes the connection between literary theory and the work of the creative writer. Amongh the works under discussion are the theoretical works of Maurice Blanchot, Walter Benjamin, Julia Kristeva, Lyn Hejinian, Charles Olson, E. M. Forster, M. M. Bakhtin, Wayne Booth, and Gertrude Stein. The emphasis will be on a close reading of these texts in order to understand the place of theory in students' own creative writing. Offered every third semester. Required of students in the Creative Writing M.F.A. program. English 504 Traditions and Lineages This seminar concentrates on the major literary movements of the twentieth century, including Imagism, Objectivism, The Harlem Renaissance, Surrealism, The Beat Generation, and The New York School. Among the writers under discussion are Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, Laura Riding, Lorine Neidecker, Langston Hughes, Andre Breton, Allen Ginsberg, and Frank O'Hara. The emphasis will be on a close reading of these writers in order to understand the traditions behind our own work. English 508 General Linguistics (same as Anthropology 508) An introduction to the basic disciplines of linguistics: phonology, history of the English language, semantics and syntax, including traditional and generative-tranformational grammar. English 509 Sociolinguistics and the Teaching of Writing An introduction to the major theories and fieldwork in sociolinguistics. Students examine the connections between language and social class, ethnicity and gender and the implications of those connections for the teaching of writing. There is also a strong focus on the analysis of second language and second dialect writing, along with an exploration of multiple literacies. English 510 Technical Writing This course introduces students to the theory and practice of producing and managing documents that are used in industry and other organizational settings. Assignments include analytical writing, editing, designing, and testing of texts. Attention will be given to style manuals, users’ manuals, research-writing, and publication (as needed). English 511 Health and Science Writing This course guides students in analyzing genres and discourses that communicate health and science information; then researching, writing, and designing their own documents; and finally reviewing and testing their documents with their peers and non-specialist readers. The course is open both to health and science specialists and to writing specialists with little health or science background. English 512 Grant Writing This course guides students through the process of developing a complete grant proposal. Though oriented primarily to grant proposals for social and cultural agencies, educational organizations, and other nonprofits, the course explores rhetorical principles and strategies that can also be applied to research proposals and business proposals. English 519 Editing This course prepares students in the research, principles, and practices of editing essential to the process of publishing. Students gain knowledge of the principles underpinning different levels of professional editing and develop their own expertise through extensive practice. English 520 Nonfiction Writing Workshop An intensive workshop devoted to writing literary nonfiction. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms. Students in the Creative Writing track or Professional Writing track may take this class three times. English 522 Academic Writing Workshop An intensive advanced writing workshop for graduate students across the disciplines who wish to polish their academic writing skills. Students write critical essays in response to professional readings. English 523 Fiction Writing Workshop Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor An intensive workshop devoted to writing works of fiction. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms. Students in the Creative Writing track may take this class three times. English 524 Poetry Writing Workshop Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor An intensive workshop devoted to writing works of poetry. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms. Students in the Creative Writing track may take this class three times. English 525 Play Writing Workshop Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor An intensive workshop devoted to writing plays. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms. Students in the Creative Writing track may take this class three times. English 526 Writing for Media I: The Story (same as Media Arts 600) An introduction to the principles of screenwriting. Students explore dramatic structure, character development, dialogue, and plot through analysis of television and film narratives. They complete a story treatment and short screenplay or teleplay as their final project. English 527 Professional Writing Workshop An introduction to the theory, research, and practice of professional writing. Topics may include writing in such professions as medicine and law, writing for non-profit and cultural institutions, writing in digital media, scientific and technical writing, business writing, and grant writing. Students will both analyze and write professional writing documents and receive detailed feedback on their writing in intensive workshops. Students in the Professional Writing track may take this class three times. English 528 Seminar in Creative Writing An intensive workshop devoted to different strategies for writing imaginative texts, especially those that cross genres. Examples of special topics are: Collage: Image and Text, Science Fiction Writing, and The Prose Poem. Students in the Creative Writing track may take this class three times. English 529 Topics in Creative Writing (one credit) This workshop will be taught by a visiting writer. Students in the Creative Writing track may take this class six times. English 530 Topics in Writing A seminar on historical, theoretical, and practical aspects of writing. Topics may include community-based writing, writing for non-profits, social networking, and representations of writing in popular culture. English 531 Topics in Rhetoric An intensive study of rhetoric. Topics may include the history of rhetoric, non-western rhetorics, feminist rhetoric, uses of propaganda, and the rhetoric of war. English 532 Topics in Theory A seminar on theory. Topics may include discourse theory, critical theory, semiotics, and genre theory. English 533 Topics in Composition A study of theories and issues that inform the discipline commonly known as Rhetoric and Composition. Topics may include theories of composing, theories of reading, narrative theory, writing across the curriculum, and writing program administration. English 546 Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature Against the backdrop of sex, scandal, war, and revolution, the eighteenth century is fundamentally a time of change. This course studies the shift in popular literary forms from drama to poetry to the newly emerging novel. Students examine cultural themes of nationalism, empire, and revolution over roughly 120 years. Authors include Aphra Behn, John Dryden, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, Olaudah Equiano, and Fanny Burney. English 571 The Eighteenth Century English Novel This course will trace the rise of the English novel and the authors who helped shape its form. Authors include Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Fanny Burney, Henry Fielding, and Jane Austen. English 573 The Nineteenth Century English Novel Topics include the Gothic novel, women novelists, the novel of empire. Authors might include Dickens, the Brontës, Eliot, Hardy, Thackeray. English 574 The Twentieth Century English Novel Studying the short and long fiction of male and female novelists, such as Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, E.M. Forster, D.H. Lawrence, Iris Murdoch, Ian McEwan, et al., this course will span the entire twentieth century and investigate topics like politics, gender relations, empire, or the development of modernist and postmodernist aesthetics. English 579 Seminar in Special Studies An intensive study of special areas of interest in literature. Examples of special topics are the works of a major author, English Renaissance and the arts, and detective fiction. English 580 Seminar in Twentieth Century Literature This course will trace some of the salient developments in Twentieth-Century World Literature. Possible topics include a study of genres such as fantasy, dystopia, or novels of ideas across different cultures, the emergence of postcolonial, minority, and diaspora literatures, the consolidation of women's literature, or the phenomenon of international modernism and postmodernism. English 620 Theories of Rhetoric and Teaching Writing An introduction to theories of teaching writing. Examines contemporary theories of rhetoric and composition, such as reader response, expressionist, cognitive, and social constructivist. English 624 Seminar in American Literature An intensive study of special areas of interest. Examples of special topics are romancing the frontier, the body in American literature, and melancholia and American literature. English 625 Nineteenth Century American Literature A study of the making of an American literature with diverse voices. Narratives, poetry, journals, essays, autobiographies, and folktalkes are considered. Authors include Poe, Hawthorne, James, Melville, Emerson, Whitman, Douglass, Twain, Crane, Dickinson, Chesnutt, Wharton, and Dreiser. English 626 Twentieth Century American Literature A review of the flowering of American letters between the two world wars. Modernism, new regionalism, expatriatism, the Harlem Renaissance, and gendered perspectives are among topics covered. Authors include Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Stein, Hurston, Frost, Hughes, Steinbeck, Eliot, Cather, West, and Stevens. English 631 Seminar in English and American Poetry Modernism, new regionalism, expatriatism, the Harlem Renaissance, and gender perspectives are among topics covered. Authors inlcude Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Stein, Hurston, Hughes, Steinbeck, Eliot, Cather, and Stevens. English 634 Twentieth Century Drama A study of selected masters of modern theater from Ibsen to Beckett. English 636 Seminar in Literary Periods and Movements An intensive study of special areas of interest. Examples of special topics are modernism, post-modernism, post-colonial literature, comparative literature. English 640 Second Language Writing This course aims to prepare graduate students to teach non-native speakers of English. Students will become knowledgeable in English syntax, rhetorical traditions of native and target languages, discipline-specific writing conventions, and issues involved in socialization. English 641 Literacy and Basic Writing An examination of the theoretical and practical questions surrounding the development of literacy, particularly in relation to basic writing instruction and multicultural contexts. English 642 Computers and Composition A study of the theories, research, and practices of new kinds of digital compositions and related social and pedagogical issues. Examines the impact of digital technology on writing and engages students in regular practice of multimodal forms composing. English 643 Seminar in Shakespeare A review of the major scholarly and critical approaches to Shakespeare. English 646 Individual and Small Group Writing Instruction A study of various collaborative and conference techniques for the teaching of writing. Designed to include theories of collaborative learning, practical applications in the classroom, and ethnographic or case study. English 649 Seminar in British Literature An intensive study of special areas of interest. Examples of special topics are Africa in British eyes and British women novelists. English 650 Seminar in Medieval Literature The course focuses on a particular text, topic, or tradition. Topics include Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, the Arthurian tradition, gender and sexuality in Medieval literature, and women of the Middle Ages. English 651 Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century English Literature With the transformations and tensions inherent in Christianity shaping the cultural climate of the time, the poetry and prose of the early modern period explore the contrast between the sacred and the profane. Authors include Philip Sidney, Christopher Marlowe, Aemilia Lanyer, John Donne, Lady Mary Wroth, Andrew Marvell, and Queen Elizabeth. English 654 Seminar in Milton Protestant Dissenter to Roman Catholic, radical to traditionalist, John Milton is a study in constrasts. This course will examine a representative body of Milton's essays and poetry in the context of his very turbulent times. Works examined include Comus, Lycidas, Of Reformation, and the greatest epic poem in English literature--Paradise Lost. English 655 Early Nineteenth Century English Literature A study of English Romantic poetry and prose non-fiction writers inlcuding Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Hemans, and Wollstonecraft. Topics might include the lyric poem, the development of national identity, the female author, the construction of the poet. English 656 Later Nineteenth Century English Literature A study of Victorian poets and non-fiction prose writers including Tennyson, Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Arnold, Swinburne, Hopkins, Dante and Christina Rosetti. Topics might include the epic poem, Victorians at home, race and empire, the medieval revival. English 670 Seminar in the Critical Tradition A study of the great literary critics, from Aristotle to T.S. Eliot. English 700 Practicum in the Teaching of Composition Prerequisite: English 641 A practicum designed to introduce new teachers to the theory and methods of writing pedagogy, with a central emphasis on classroom practice. English 705 Independent Study Prerequisite: Twelve graduate credits in English and permission of Department Chair. A tutorial seminar designed for advanced individual research or writing projects. Hours to be arranged. English 707 Methods of Research and Criticism A study of research techniques and critical approaches to literature. The writing of a literary critical essay is included. Required of students in all concentrations. Must be taken in the first Fall semester of graduate enrollment. English 708 Thesis (Pass/Fail Only) Click here to see the Graduate Thesis Manual.
    With Concentration in Literature Prerequisite: At least 21 credits in graduate English courses completed with a 3.0 grade point average and permission of the thesis director, the graduate advisor, and the Department Chair. With Concentration in Creative Writing Prerequisite: At least 21 credits in graduate English courses (12 of them in writing) completed with a 3.0 grade point average and permission of the thesis director, the graduate advisor, and the Department Chair. With Concentration in Professional Writing Prerequisite: At least 21 credits in graduate English courses (12 of them in writing) completed with a 3.0 grade point average and permission of the thesis director, the graduate advisor, and the Department Chair.

    With Concentration in the Teaching of Writing
    Prerequisite: At least 21 credits in graduate English courses (12 of them in the teaching of writing) completed with a 3.0 grade point average and permission of the thesis director, the graduate advisor, and the Department Chair.

    Undergraduate Courses


    These are the generic descriptions of undergraduate English courses, as they appear in the Bulletin. For upper-division courses (those numbered above 100), instructors write more specific descriptions each time a course is offered. For those descriptions of specific sections, see Course Descriptions by Semester.

    BACK TO THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT WEBSITE

     
    Writing Program Courses

    The English Department's Writing Program is a three-semester course of studies meant to improve reading and writing skills by engaging students in serious study of interdisciplinary issues. The program is meant to advance the student from the level of writing short essays of description and narration, through proficiency in reading/writing expository prose using various rhetorical modes and aims, to the reading and writing skills required to research, develop and document a paper responding to a significant question or problem.  Student placement is determined by the student's performance on the English Placement Exam or acceptance of appropriate transfer credit.

    English 13 English Composition
    The first semester concentrates on improving the student's ability to read, analyze and respond in journal writing and more formal essays to thematic issues in humanities, social science and/or natural science. English 14 English Composition
    The second semester concentrates on challenging and improving the student's ability to read, analyze and respond in more sophisticated ways to issues in humanities, social science and/or natural science. Prerequisite: English 13 or placement. English 16 English Composition The third semester expands the level and modes of inquiry to include more complex topics. Points of logic, substance and responsibility to the reader are emphasized. Prerequisite: English 14 or placement. English 13x, 14x, and 16x
    English 13x, 14x, and 16x are courses parallel to English 13, 14, and 16, for non-native speakers who need additional work in English as a second language.
    Core Surveys of Literature in English
    Any two courses from English 61 through 64 satisfy the Humanities Area I requirement of the core curriculum.
    English 61 European Literatures I:  (Beginnings to the Eighteenth Century)
    Prerequisite: English 16 An examination of significant works of the Western tradition from Ancient Greece and Rome and Medieval and Renaissance Italy, France, Germany and England. Close intensive readings from a wide representation of texts--epics, sacred books, poems, plays and tales arranged chronologically or thematically. All texts read in English.
    English 62 European Literatures II:  (From the Eighteenth Century to the Present)
    Prerequisite: English 16 An examination of important works of literature from both Western and Eastern Europe. Close, intensive reading from a wide representation of texts: novels, poems, plays and essays arranged chronologically or thematically. All texts read in English.
    English 63 American Literatures
    Prerequisite: English 16 The focus of each section concentrates on the literatures and traditions of the United States from Colonial times to the present or on a comparison and contrast of literatures across all the Americas North America, the Caribbean, Latin America. Arranged chronologically or thematically. All texts read in English.
    English 64 Non-Western Literatures
    Prerequisite: English 16 Drawing primarily from among the many literatures of Africa and Asia, each section focuses on at least two geographical areas, such as Western Africa, China, India, Japan, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands. Broad sweeps of time may be covered or specific periods of high cultural achievements such as the Tang Dynasty, Medieval Japan or West Africa before the European invasion. All texts read in English.
    Major Level Courses
    English 101 Introduction to English Studies
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Required of all English majors (who should take this course in the first or second semester of upper-division work in English), this course maps out the field of English Studies and provides a foundation for more advanced study in literature, creative writing, and rhetoric. Students develop skills in close reading, argumentation, prosody, and research. The course addresses issues in critical theory and introduces students to literary and rhetorical traditions.
    English 102 History of Literary Theory
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Readings survey the history of literary theory from Plato to the present. A wide variety of critical approaches are discussed, including classicism, neoclassicism, romanticism, Marxism, the new criticism, structuralism, psychoanalytic criticism, feminism, gay studies, post-structuralism, ethnic studies, the new historicism and cultural studies. Subjects differ from semester to semester. May be taken twice for credit.
    English 103 Workshop in the Essay (Same as Journalism 150)
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A nonfiction writing workshop in the genre of the essay. Content open to subjects across the disciplines, with particular emphasis on the essay as a literary form. Development of writing techniques through analysis of professional and student work. Weekly class sessions and frequent conferences on student work.
    English 104 Creative Writing
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 An introductory creative-writing workshop. Students begin to learn and experiment with the art of writing in various genres, such as poetry, fiction, and playwriting. Although readings are included, emphasis is on class discussion of student manuscripts and individual conferences with the instructor.
    English 119 Masterpieces of World Literature
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Readings in and discussions of masterpieces of world literature ranging from European and American texts to the literatures of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. The course includes texts such as The Iliad, "The Dream of the Red Chamber", and Sundiata. Authors studied range from Sophocles and Dante to Moliere, Goethe, and Morrison.
    English 126 News Writing (Same as Journalism 119)
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 (Note: If you register for JOU 119, the only prerequisite is ENG 16.) Introduction to the writing of news stories studied for their organization, form, style and effectiveness as expression and communication. In newsroom laboratory sessions, students apply professional standards to their frequent assignments.
    English 128 Early British Literatures
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 An exploration of significant texts and topics in British literature from a period of at least 200 years prior to 1800, including texts by Chaucer and Shakespeare. Themes vary from semester to semester and may include topics such as the Monstrous and the Fantastic, Sexuality and Gender in Medieval & the Renaissance, or Heroic Identities before 1700.
    English 129 Later British Literatures
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 An exploration of significant texts and topics in British literature between 1800 and the present. Themes vary from semester to semester and may include topics such as the Age of Revolution, Writing Empire, or (Re)Writing Religion in Modern British Literature.
    English 137 Shakespeare
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 The greatness of Shakespeare explored through the intensive study of selected plays and poems.
    English 140 Major Authors
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A concentrated study of one or two authors or a writer and a major school American or British. Topics may include Chaucer, Jonson, Donne, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Austen, Woolf and the Bloomsbury Circle, Faulkner, Hemingway, Wright and the Chicago School, Morrison. Subjects differ from semester to semester. May be taken twice for credit.
    English 150 Studies in Ethnic Literature
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 An intensive examination of particular traditions in literature. Topics may include African-American literature, Asian-American literature, Jewish literature, Russian literature, Latino/a literature. Subjects differ from semester to semester. May be taken twice for credit.
    English 158 Early Literatures of the United States
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 An introduction to texts and themes in pre-Civil War American literature. Themes vary from semester to semester. Areas of exploration may include: Examining the Frontier, Slavery and Freedom, American Myths and U.S. Realities.
    English 159 Literatures of the United States Since 1865
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 In this course, texts and themes are drawn from American literature from the Civil War to the present. Themes vary from semester to semester. Possible topics include: Country and City, Representing the Nation, Literature of a Multicultural United States.
    English 160 Gender and Language
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 An examination of the relationship of gender and sexuality to studies of reading, writing, language use and language acquisition. Topics may include gender and reading, lesbian and gay voices, language and gender, queer theory, images of women in literature, contemporary masculinities, writing about lesbian and gay issues. Subjects differ from semester to semester. May be taken twice for credit.
    English 163 Explorations in Non-Fiction Writing (same as Journalism 150)
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64. A nonfiction workshop in which students explore topics that include the essay, experimental nonfiction, zine writing, and digital storytelling. Emphasis on discussion of student manuscripts and individual conferences with instructor. May be taken twice for credit. Writing & Rhetoric may take this class twice for credit.
    English 164 Explorations in Creative Writing
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64. A creative writing workshop in which students explore topics in writing including spoken word poetry, experimental fiction, poet's theater, short short story writing, and dramatic storytelling. Emphasis on discussion of student manuscripts and presentations and individual conferences with instructor. English majors concentrating in Creative Writing may take this class twice for credit.
    English 165 Poetry Workshop
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and English 104 (Creative Writing) An intensive workshop devoted to writing poetry. Students will also be required to read selected poetry from published poets. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms and approaches. English majors concentrating in Creative Writing may take this class twice for credit.
    English 166 Fiction Workshop
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and English 104 (Creative Writing) An intensive workshop devoted to writing fiction. Students will also be required to read selected fiction from published writers. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms and approaches. English majors concentrating in Creative Writing may take this class twice for credit.
    English 167 Playwriting Workshop
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and English 104 (Creative Writing) An intensive workshop devoted to writing plays. Students will also be required to read selected plays from published playwrights. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms and approaches. English majors concentrating in Creative Writing may take this class twice for credit.
    English 168 Creative Non-Fiction Workshop
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and English 103 (Workshop in the Essay) An intensive workshop devoted to writing literary essays. Students will also be required to read selected essays from published authors. Class time will be spent critiquing each other's writing and discussing traditional and experimental forms and approaches. English majors concentrating in Creative Writing may take this class twice for credit. English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric orCreative Writing may take this class twice for credit.
    English 169 Non-Western or Post-Colonial Literature
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 This course focuses on works, in English and in translation, emerging from non-Western cultures, including the cultures of Africa, Asia, and South America. Courses in this category must span a geographical region and a period of time adequate to address the historical context of the literature. Themes vary from semester to semester and may include topics such as: Voices of the African Diaspora, Buddhism in Asian Literatures, or Post-Colonial Literature and the Atlantic World.
    English 170 Literary Periods and Movements
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A concentrated study of a particular period or movement in literary history. The focus may be on a specific national literature (American or British) or on the theoretical underpinnings of these movements. Topics may include colonial encounters, romanticism, the Victorians, realism and naturalism, modernism, postmodernism. Subjects differ from semester to semester. May be taken twice for credit.
    English 171 Introduction to Classical Rhetoric
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Readings survey key figures and texts of the rhetorical traditions (ancient through Enlightenment). Course work emphasizes mastery of the material central to the development of the field of rhetoric.
    English 172 Introduction to Contemporary Rhetorical Theory
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Readings survey key figures and texts in contemporary rhetorical theory (Nineteenth Century to the present). Course work emphasizes mastery of key rhetorical and theoretical concepts and focuses on how these theories have been influenced by earlier developments and how they have influenced current trends.
    English 173 Writing in the Community
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A writing workshop in which students study the rhetoric and writing of community-based and other advocacy organizations. Topics vary from semester to semester and may include rhetorical analysis of community-based texts and strategies for the production of a range of writing, such as oral histories, grant proposals and pamphlets. English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric may take this class twice for credit.
    English 174 Teaching Writing
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A seminar in which students survey the history, theories and practices of teaching writing at the high school and college levels. Topics vary from semester to semester and may include the history of writing instruction, composition theories and pedagogies, literacy theories and research, one-to-one conferencing, developing and designing curricula and assignments and responding to student writing. English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric may take this class twice for credit.
    English 175 Writing for the Professions Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A writing workshop in which students study rhetorical strategies for professional and technical writing. Topics vary from semester to semester and may include writing grant proposals, reports, news releases, editorials, brochures, technical manuals, and a range of public documents. English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric may take this class twice for credit.
    English 180 Genre Studies
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A study of a particular genre, offering examples from a wide range of literary history. Topics may include autobiography, great essays, the history of the novel, the making of modern poetry. Subjects differ from semester to semester. May be taken twice for credit.
    English 184 Modern Drama
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 A study of selected nineteenth- and twentieth-century playwrights, focusing on their investigation of contemporary issues and problems.
    English 187 The Bible as Literature
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 The study of the Bible (in the King James version) as a work of literature, both for its expressiveness in language and images and its relation to the standard literary forms lyric poetry, drama or debate, narrative, etc. Those features of the Bible that are universal or archetypal in terms of its symbols or imaginative content. The ideas or world-view implied in the Bible and their comparisons or contrasts with those of other civilizations.
    English 190 Senior Seminar in Literature
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and Permission of English Department Chair. English majors concentrating in Literature pursue independent research projects in the history of literary studies or critical analysis. Each student develops a substantial research paper and presents it to the seminar.
    English 191 Senior Seminar in Creative Writing
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and Permission of English Department Chair. In this capstone course, English majors concentrating in Creative Writing pursue independent writing projects, resulting in a portfolio of poems, fiction, plays, or essays.
    English 192 Senior Seminar in Writing & Rhetoric
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 and Permission of English Department Chair. In this capstone course, English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric apply the rhetorical knowledge and skills they have mastered in their other courses. Each student produces a substantial research paper analyzing a field-related issue or problem through the lens of his or her academic work in writing and rhetoric. May include a relevant internship.
    English 195, 196 Honors Study
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Honors Study is designed to give outstanding students an opportunity to do independent work in their major under the guidance of a member of the faculty. To be eligible, students must have upper-junior or senior status, a cumulative quality-point ratio of 3.00, a 3.25 ratio in their major subject, Permission of English Department Chair and Permission of the Dean. A total of six credits of Honors Study is the maximum allowed. Three credits per semester.
    English 197, 198 Independent Study
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64, Permission of English Department Chair and Permission of the Dean.
    Independent Study & Tutorial--a simplified guide (this document is for use by full-time faculty who are trying to set up an independent study or tutorial with a student) Independent studies in areas of specialized interest are available. Three credits per semester. English 200 Series
    Prerequisites: Any two courses from English 61-64 Courses in this series emphasize nontraditional subject matter and approaches to literature and vary from semester to semester. Previous topics have included: Asian/Asian-American Writers, Latin American Women Writers, Science Fiction, Representations of Women in Literature, Constructions of Masculinity in Black Literature, Africa in the British Imagination and Hispanic-American Fiction.


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